Chat with us, powered by LiveChat Annotated Bibliography In each week of this course, you will research and select three peer-reviewed, scholarly sources to develop an annotated bibliography that y | WriteDen

Annotated Bibliography In each week of this course, you will research and select three peer-reviewed, scholarly sources to develop an annotated bibliography that y

Read all pages carefully, selected topic, intro & must be follow format according to Sample Paper (3-3 Para each Article)                  

Must be 100% Original                  

I hv already attached Articles, u must be use this 3 articles for Annotated Bibliography      

Wk 7 Discussion (Due in 1 day) Urgent/..Wk 7 Discussion (Required Assignment) Due in 1 day.docx

(Must be 4 to 5 Pages)

Must be 100% Original Work Assignment must be follow Rubric Superior Criteria

Plz read My Note, Important tips (Wrote on 2nd Page) and also sample paper attached.

Must be use attached Three Article

NOTE: I hv attached 3 Articles & include each Article have (3 para) three paragraph summary, Analysis and application to the study.

New Selected topic: Strategies Used by Agency Leaders to Safeguard Rosewood Trade (Annotated Bibliography must be write on related this topic & Apply)

MY Notes: (Must see sample paper)

Sample Annotated Bibliography attached so must be follow & minimum 3 pages required & three (3) peer-reviewed sources (no older than 5 years).

(4-5 Pages required )Must be include Abstract/Intro like in sample

Course: DDBA – Doctoral Study Mentoring

Selected topic: Strategies Used by Agency Leaders to Safeguard Rosewood Trade

Discussion 2: Annotated Bibliography

In each week of this course, you will research and select three (3) peer-reviewed, scholarly sources to develop an annotated bibliography that you can use in your Doctoral Study. You will need to take the three sources and synthesize the references into a single narrative annotated bibliography that compares/contrasts or supports your study. For example, you may develop three references that will fit into the Nature of the Study (or any other component) and then the synthesized version will help you in developing your Prospectus/Proposal. Please see this week’s Learning Resources for the Sample Annotated Bibliography Template, which you should use to complete your annotated bibliography.

By Day 3

Post your synthesized annotated bibliography narrative that includes an explanation of how these references relate to one or more components of your Doctoral Study and incorporates specific references to the Doctoral Study Rubric.

Refer to the Week 7 Discussion 2 Rubric for specific grading elements and criteria. Your Instructor will use this rubric to assess your work.

Important tips: Include each Article annotated bibliography have three paragraph summary, Analysis and applies to the study

Walden's recommendations for formatting an AB includes three areas, typically formatted in three paragraphs: 

This first paragraph of the annotation summarizes the source. It outlines the main findings and primary methods of the study.

Summary: What did the author do? Why? What did he/she find?

This second paragraph of the annotation analyzes the source. It explains the benefits of the source but also the limitations.

Analysis: Was the author’s method sound? What information was missing? Is this a scholarly source?

This third paragraph of the annotation applies the source. It explains how the source’s ideas, research, and information can be applied to other contexts.

Application: Does this article apply to the literature? How would you be able to apply this method/study to your particular study? Is the article universal?

In general, annotated bibliographies should avoid referring to the first or second person (I, me, my, we, our, you, and us). Instead, students should aim to be objective and remove themselves from annotations. However, there may be some exceptions to this guideline. Check with your instructor if you are unsure about whether he/she will allow you to use “I” in your annotated bibliography.

Must be use Below Three Article for Annotated Bibliography & related intro & topic

Balanay, R. M., Reyes, S. G., Bongolan, R. L., Cutao, J. M., Casinginan, R. C., & Omboy, A. V. (2022). Assessing timber trade middlemen for development policy actions: A case study in the Caraga Region, Philippines. Humanities and Social Sciences Communications, 9(1). https://doi.org/10.1057/s41599-022-01176-7

Gulbrandsen, L. H. (2008). The role of Science in Environmental Governance: Competing knowledge producers in Swedish and Norwegian forestry. Global Environmental Politics, 8(2), 99–122. https://doi.org/10.1162/glep.2008.8.2.99

Musselwhite, G., & Herath, G. (2005). Australia's Regional Forest Agreement Process: Analysis of the potential and problems. Forest Policy and Economics, 7(4), 579–588. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.forpol.2003.11.001

(Balanay et al., 2022)

(Gulbrandsen, 2008)

(Musselwhite & Herath, 2005)

Assignment must be follow Rubric Superior Criteria

Rubric Detail

 

 

Superior

Excellent

Satisfactory

Marginal

Unsatisfactory

Not Submitted

Element 1: Annotated Bibliography (post and attach document)

6.6 (30%)

Student posts and includes an attachment of his/her annotated bibliography which includes three peer-reviewed, scholarly sources that are thoroughly synthesized into a single, well-written narrative annotated bibliography that explicitly compares/contrasts or supports his/her study. A thorough and detailed explanation of how the sources relate to his/her study is evident.

6.27 (28.5%)

Student posts and includes an attachment of his/her annotated bibliography which includes three peer-reviewed, scholarly sources that are thoroughly synthesized into a single, well-written narrative annotated bibliography that explicitly compares/contrasts or supports his/her study. A detailed explanation of how the sources relate to his/her study is evident. One or two minor details are missing or lack clarity.

5.61 (25.5%)

Student posts and includes an attachment of his/her annotated bibliography which includes three peer-reviewed, scholarly sources that are synthesized into a single narrative annotated bibliography that explicitly compares/contrasts or supports his/her study. An explanation with some details of how the sources relate to his/her study is evident.

4.95 (22.5%)

Student posts and includes an attachment of his/her annotated bibliography which includes three peer-reviewed, scholarly sources that are somewhat synthesized into a single narrative annotated bibliography that compares/contrasts or supports his/her study. A cursory statement of how the sources relate to his/her study is evident.

3.3 (15%)

Does not meet minimal standards and/or is posted late.

(0%)

Did not submit element.

Element 2: Follow-up Responses

8.8 (40%)

On Day 5 and on Day 7, student's responses fully contribute to the quality of interaction by offering constructive critique, suggestions, in-depth questions, and/or additional resources related to peers' annotated bibliography. Student demonstrates active engagement with more than one peer on at least two days in the discussion forum (or with Instructor if there are no other peers/posts).

8.36 (38%)

On Day 5 and on Day 7, student shares some constructive critique, suggestions, in-depth questions, and/or additional resources related to peers' annotated bibliography, but more depth and/or clarity around ideas is needed. Student demonstrates active engagement with more than one peer on at least two days in the discussion forum (or with Instructor if there are no other peers/posts).

7.48 (34%)

Student did not post on Day 5 and on Day 7, but he/she did engage with at least one peer (or with Instructor if there are no other peers/posts) during the week offering constructive feedback related to peers' annotated bibliography.

6.6 (30%)

Student posts to at least one peer (or with Instructor if there are no other peers/posts) but response is cursory and/or off topic.

4.4 (20%)

Does not meet minimal standards and/or student posted late.

(0%)

Did not submit element.

Element 3: Written Delivery Style & Grammar

3.3 (15%)

Student consistently follows APA writing style and basic rules of formal English grammar and written essay style. Student communicates in a cohesive, logical style. There are no spelling or grammar errors.

3.13 (14.25%)

Student consistently follows APA writing style and basic rules of formal English grammar and written essay style. Student communicates in a cohesive, logical style. There are one or two minor errors in spelling or grammar.

2.81 (12.75%)

Student mostly follows APA writing style and basic rules of formal English grammar and written essay style. Student mostly communicates in a cohesive, logical style. There are some errors in spelling or grammar.

2.48 (11.25%)

Student does not follow APA writing style and basic rules of formal English grammar and written essay style and does not communicate in a cohesive, logical style.

1.65 (7.5%)

Does not meet minimal standards.

(0%)

Did not submit element.

Element 4: Formal and Appropriate Documentation of Evidence, Attribution of Ideas (APA Citations)

3.3 (15%)

Student demonstrates full adherence to scholarly reference requirements and adheres to APA style with respect to source attribution, references, heading and subheading logic, table of contents and lists of charts, etc. There are no APA errors.

3.13 (14.25%)

Student demonstrates full adherence to scholarly reference requirements and adheres to APA style with respect to source attribution, references, heading and subheading logic, table of contents and lists of charts, etc. There are one or two minor errors in APA style or format.

2.81 (12.75%)

Student mostly adheres to scholarly reference requirements and/or mostly adheres to APA style with respect to source attribution, references, heading and subheading logic, table of contents and lists of charts, etc. Some errors in APA format and style are evident.

2.48 (11.25%)

Student demonstrates weak or inconsistent adherence scholarly reference requirements and/or weak or inconsistent adherence to APA style with respect to source attribution, references, heading and subheading logic, table of contents and lists of charts, etc. Several errors in APA format and style are evident.

1.65 (7.5%)

Does not meet minimal standards.

(0%)

Did not submit element.

Wk 7 Discussion (Due in 1 day) Urgent/.Sample_Annotated_Bibliography.doc

PAGE

1

Sample Annotated Bibliography

Student Name Here

Walden University

Sample Annotated Bibliography

Autism research continues to grapple with activities that best serve the purpose of fostering positive interpersonal relationships for children who struggle with autism. Children have benefited from therapy sessions that provide ongoing activities to aid autistic children’s ability to engage in healthy social interactions. However, less is known about how K–12 schools might implement programs for this group of individuals to provide additional opportunities for growth, or even if and how school programs would be of assistance in the end. There is a gap, then, in understanding the possibilities of implementing such programs in schools to foster the social and thus mental health of children with autism.

Annotated Bibliography

Kenny , M. C., Dinehart, L. H., & Winick, C. B. (2016). Child-centered play therapy for children with autism spectrum disorder. In A. A. Drewes & C. E. Schaefer (Eds.), Play therapy in middle childhood (pp. 103–147). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

In this chapter, Kenny, Dinehart, and Winick provided a case study of the treatment of a 10-year-old boy diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ADS). Kenny et al. described the rationale and theory behind the use of child-centered play therapy (CCPT) in the treatment of a child with ASD. Specifically, children with ADS often have sociobehavioral problems that can be improved when they have a safe therapy space for expressing themselves emotionally through play that assists in their interpersonal development. The authors outlined the progress made by the patient in addressing the social and communicative impairments associated with ASD. Additionally, the authors explained the role that parents have in implementing CCPT in the patient’s treatment. Their research on the success of CCPT used qualitative data collected by observing the patient in multiple therapy sessions .

CCPT follows research carried out by other theorists who have identified the role of play in supporting cognition and interpersonal relationships. This case study is relevant to the current conversation surrounding the emerging trend toward CCPT treatment in adolescents with ASD as it illustrates how CCPT can be successfully implemented in a therapeutic setting to improve the patient’s communication and socialization skills. However, Kenny et al. acknowledged that CCPT has limitations—children with ADS, who are not highly functioning and or are more severely emotionally underdeveloped, are likely not suited for this type of therapy .

Kenny et al.’s explanation of this treatments’s implementation is useful for professionals in the psychology field who work with adolescents with ASD. This piece is also useful to parents of adolescents with ASD, as it discusses the role that parents can play in successfully implementing the treatment. However, more information is needed to determine if this program would be suitable as part of a K–12 school program focused on the needs of children with ASD .

Stagmitti, K. (2016). Play therapy for school-age children with high-functioning autism. In A.A. Drewes and C. E. Schaefer (Eds.), Play therapy in middle cildhood (pp. 237–255). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Stagmitti discussed how the Learn to Play program fosters the social and personal development of children who have high functioning autism. The program is designed as a series of play sessions carried out over time, each session aiming to help children with high functioning autism learn to engage in complex play activities with their therapist and on their own. The program is beneficial for children who are 1- to 8-years old if they are already communicating with others both nonverbally and verbally. Through this program, the therapist works with autistic children by initiating play activities, helping children direct their attention to the activity, eventually helping them begin to initiate play on their own by moving past the play narrative created by the therapist and adding new, logical steps in the play scenario themselves. The underlying rationale for the program is that there is a link between the ability of children with autism to create imaginary play scenarios that are increasingly more complex and the development of emotional well-being and social skills in these children. Study results from the program have shown that the program is successful: Children have developed personal and social skills of several increment levels in a short time. While Stagmitti provided evidence that the Learn to Play program was successful, she also acknowledged that more research was needed to fully understand the long-term benefits of the program.

Stagmitti offered an insightful overview of the program; however, her discussion was focused on children identified as having high-functioning autism, and, therefore, it is not clear if and how this program works for those not identified as high-functioning. Additionally, Stagmitti noted that the program is already initiated in some schools but did not provide discussion on whether there were differences or similarities in the success of this program in that setting.

Although Stagmitti’s overview of the Learn to Play program was helpful for understanding the possibility for this program to be a supplementary addition in the K–12 school system, more research is needed to understand exactly how the program might be implemented, the benefits of implementation, and the drawbacks. Without this additional information, it would be difficult for a researcher to use Stigmitti’s research as a basis for changes in other programs. However, it does provide useful context and ideas that researchers can use to develop additional research programs.

Wimpory, D. C., & Nash, S. (1999). Musical interaction therapy–Therapeutic play for children with autism. Child Language and Teaching Therapy, 15(1), 17–28. doi:10.1037/14776-014

Wimpory and Nash provided a case study for implementing music interaction therapy as part of play therapy aimed at cultivating communication skills in infants with ASD. The researchers based their argument on films taken of play-based therapy sessions that introduced music interaction therapy. To assess the success of music play, Wimpory and Nash filmed the follow-up play-based interaction between the parent and the child. The follow-up interactions revealed that 20 months after the introduction of music play, the patient developed prolonged playful interaction with both the psychologist and the parent. The follow-up films also revealed that children initiated spontaneously pretend play during these later sessions. After the introduction of music, the patient began to develop appropriate language skills.

Since the publication date for this case study is 1999, the results are dated. Although this technique is useful, emerging research in the field has undoubtedly changed in the time since the article was published. Wimpory and Nash wrote this article for a specific audience, including psychologists and researchers working with infants diagnosed with ASD. This focus also means that other researchers beyond these fields may not find the researcher’s findings applicable.

This research is useful to those looking for background information on the implementation of music into play-based therapy in infants with ASD. Wimpory and Nash presented a basis for this technique and outlined its initial development. Thus, this case study can be useful in further trials when paired with more recent research.

�The format of an annotated bibliography can change depending on the assignment and instructor preference, but the typical format for an annotated bibliography in academic writing is a list of reference entries with each entry followed by an annotation (hence the name, “annotated bibliography”).

However, APA does not have specific rules or guidelines for annotated bibliographies, so be sure to ask your instructor for any course-specific requirements that may vary from the general format.

�An introduction is a helpful addition to your annotated bibliography to tell your reader (a) your topic and focus for your research and (b) the general context of your topic.

Although your assignment instructions may not explicitly ask for an introduction, your instructor might expect you to include one. If you are not sure, be sure to ask your instructor.

�Use a Level 1 heading titled “Annotated Bibliography” or any other wording your instructor has given you to indicate to your reader that the annotations will go next and separate this section from the introduction paragraph above.

�Format your reference entries per APA, as well as follow APA style when writing your paragraphs. However, as mentioned above, this is the extent of the formatting requirements APA has for annotated bibliographies.

The content of the paragraphs and how many paragraphs you include in each annotation follows academic writing conventions, your assignment guidelines, and your instructor preferences.

�This first paragraph of the annotation summarizes the source. It outlines the main findings and primary methods of the study.

�This second paragraph of the annotation analyzes the source. It explains the benefits of the source but also the limitations.

�This third paragraph of the annotation applies the source. It explains how the source’s ideas, research, and information can be applied to other contexts.

In general, annotated bibliographies should avoid referring to the first or second person (I, me, my, we, our, you, and us). Instead, students should aim to be objective and remove themselves from annotations. However, there may be some exceptions to this guideline. Check with your instructor if you are unsure about whether he/she will allow you to use “I” in your annotated bibliography.

Wk 7 Discussion (Due in 1 day) Urgent/Assessing timber trade middlemen.pdf

ARTICLE

Assessing timber trade middlemen for development policy actions: a case study in the Caraga region, Philippines Raquel M. Balanay 1,2, Shiela G. Reyes 3✉, Rodrigo L. Bongolan Jr.3, Jaime M. Cutao Jr.2,

Ronie C. Casinginan Jr.2 & Andrew V. Omboy Jr.2

The timber trade middlemen are examined in this work to understand their functions, work

conditions and work outcomes in the Caraga Region (Philippines) for development insights.

Investigative practice and comparative observation were the approaches used to assess these

middlemen. The results exhibit the essential role of the timber trade middlemen from log

cutting to log delivery and in the regularity of timber trade operations across Caraga Region.

Merchant middlemen, agent middlemen and service providers are the three general mid-

dlemen types observed. The service providers have the largest number and composition with

six subtypes. Further results show that the purchase order holders (merchant middlemen)

can profit largely (more than 20%) from the buy and sell of logs. The timber trade mid-

dlemen’s work conditions have issues with personal security, occupational safety, price

uncertainty and transparency. They have been involved “incognito” in timber trade opera-

tions, rendering some of them vulnerable and less protected in the timber supply chain. Policy

actions to enhance transparency and recognize properly these middlemen for the safe

conduct of their businesses, for further skills development, for their organization in the timber

industry, and for incentivizing their services properly are recommended for the sustainable

development of the timber supply chain in Caraga Region.

https://doi.org/10.1057/s41599-022-01176-7 OPEN

1 College of Agriculture and Agri-industries, Caraga State University, Butuan, Philippines. 2 NICER-ITPS Center, Caraga State University, Butuan, Philippines. 3 Agusan del Sur State College of Agriculture and Technology, Bunawan, Philippines. ✉email: [email protected]

HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES COMMUNICATIONS | (2022) 9:185 | https://doi.org/10.1057/s41599-022-01176-7 1

12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 () :,;

Introduction

C araga Region is located in the northeastern part of Mindanao where the established timberland is the fourth largest in the Philippines at 992,131 hectares (DENR-

FMB, 2020). Log production in the region is highest at 573,782.08 cubic meters across the country (DENR-FMB, 2020), which retains the title for the Caraga Region as the country’s Timber Corridor (Peras et al., 2020). On average, around 65% of the country’s timber supply is procured from the region annually (DENR-FMB, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018). In 2011, by virtue of Executive Order (EO) 23 that promulgated the prohibition of the cutting of trees from the natural and the residual forests in the country, the timber industry in the region underwent a major change due to the consequent rigid regulatory schemes. The region’s timber industry performance plummeted drastically following the enforcement of EO 23, but bounced back with the flourish of the planted forests and the cohesive adaptation of stakeholders, especially the timber trade middlemen (Peras et al., 2020). However, these middlemen, except for the wood pro- cessors, have been unrecognized for years, because there is yet no accreditation system to enroll them for proper recognition in the wood/timber industry in the region. Particularly, these middle- men have been assisting the industry to ensure continuous log supply for the wood processors and to ensure accessible log buyers for the tree farmers. Yet, there is scarcity of information regarding their functions, specializations, and issues in the timber supply chain, which can potentially impede welfare improvement along the chain.

The region is also the highest in log consumption in the country with the huge volume required for its wood processing plants (DENR-Forest Management Bureau, 2018; Peras et al., 2020). In 2018, it posted a total log requirement for wood pro- cessing at around 719,000 cubic meters, to which it could only provide 72% of the volume required (DENR-FMB, 2018). Log importation and procurement from other regions help fill the gap nonetheless (DENR-FMB, 2018; Peras et al., 2020). The unrec- ognized middlemen as go-between and intermediaries organize the activities necessary for the smooth flow of log and financial resources from the tree farmers and the wood processing plants and vice versa. These individuals have learned to handle the craft smartly for the daily operations of the wood processing plants and the timber industry in the Caraga Region and also overseas with log exports being made. Thus, this work advocates for the research on the middlemen and their specific functions in the timber supply chain to address information scarcity on this aspect and to understand these individuals in the timber trade in Caraga Region. Generally, these middlemen have been perceived sulliedly as necessary evils in log/timber marketing.

As this work addresses the information gap about the mid- dlemen in the timber trade, it is driven to produce insights for these middlemen to be properly recognized. These middlemen are widely perceived to be manipulating prices and business trans- actions to their advantage (Bertomeu, 2008; Dong and He, 2017), Such perception is checked and tried to be explained based on factual observations, particularly on the conditions/opportunities that could have allowed such manipulative behavior among the timber trade middlemen. This work presents the baseline speci- fically about the types of middlemen in the timber trade apart from the wood processors, their personal background, their specific activities, and their economic shares in the trade. The issues and constraints in the performance of their activities are tackled also to present the limiting conditions they have to sur- mount to facilitate the regular operations of the timber industry for local and international markets. Caraga Region as the Timber Corridor of the Philippines has a pivotal role in the upgrading of the timber industry with relevant policies that would look into the

welfare of its key stakeholders, including the middlemen. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this work has pioneered in the study of the timber trade middlemen in Caraga Region to discuss the policy implications for the proper recognition and main- streaming of these middlemen in the region’s timber industry development.

Review of literature Timber trade in Caraga Region has already ex

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