Chat with us, powered by LiveChat Need 2 to 3 pages on Operations for hypothetical company which is run by first nations/ Indigenous in Canada. need to add this things in the assignment which I h | WriteDen

Need 2 to 3 pages on Operations for hypothetical company which is run by first nations/ Indigenous in Canada. need to add this things in the assignment which I h

  

Hi 

Need 2 to 3 pages on Operations for hypothetical company which is run by first nations/ Indigenous in Canada. need to add this things in the assignment which I had already done. i am also attaching the file which I did but I want you to add more operations strategies for it.

in team assignment file u will see my work and in busi assig attachment you will see what required and first nations assignment is all about instructions

your part is very generic. those are specific points. Assignment 2 should be detailed and not generic. You haven't used any frameworks or mentioned any operations-related theories, pls do some research on what roles are key in mining, gas & construction sectors. You need to provide your recommendations too which is highly important ( as it needs to be specific)

COPYRIGHT PAGE

L’école n’entend donner ni approbation ni improbation aux opinions émises dans les thèses. Ces écrits doivent être considérés comme propres à leurs auteurs.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

Brent Ramsay was born in Delisle, Saskatchewan, Canada. He attended the University of Saskatchewan and graduated with a B.A. Honors. He attended Simon Fraser University and graduated with an MBA in Business Administration in 2016. Brent is an Advanced Practitioner of the Association for Conflict Resolution, a certified practitioner with the Academy of Family Mediators, and an Approved Instructor with the International Critical Incident Stress Foundation. He has worked and consulted in numerous Indigenous communities. He is presently a researcher and sessional lecturer with Simon Fraser University. He began his doctoral studies at the Paris School of Business in December 2016.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which the majority of the information

provided by Indigenous peoples was in the unceded territory of the Coast Salish peoples,

including the territories of the xʷməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam), Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), and

Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh) Nations.

iii.

iv

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Biographical Sketch

Acknowledgements

Table of Contents

List of Tables

List of Figures

List of Diagrams

List of Abbreviations

Abstract

SECTION I: INTRODUCTION, DEFINITIONS & CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORKS

Chapter One 1

Introduction

Preface Who are First Nations people? Where should entrepreneurship research start? Primary Dissertation Inquiry Dissertation Roadmap Chapter Overviews Postface Thesis Flowchart Flowchart Annotations

Chapter Two 13

Definitions and Conceptual Frameworks: Entrepreneurship, Entrepreneurs, New Venture Creation and Motivation

Preface Definitions

a. Entrepreneurship b. Entrepreneurs c. New Venture Creation d. Motivation

v

Conceptual Frameworks a. Four-Variable Framework for Describing New Venture Creation b. Organizational Emergence Model c. Goal Setting Theory of Motivation d. Other Frameworks

Conclusions Postface

SECTION II: LITERATURE REVIEWS

Chapter Three 28

Literature Review 1: First Nation Entrepreneurship: Organization, Process, Environment and Individual Motivation Preface Variable One and Two: Organization and Process

Inferred Entrepreneurship? a. Membertou First Nation b. Meadow Lake Tribal Council c. Tahltan Nation d. Essipit Innu First Nation e. Westbank First Nation Reality of First Nation On-reserve Entrepreneurship

Variable Three: Environment a. Challenges to First Nation Entrepreneurship b. Benefits of First Nation Entrepreneurship

Variable Four: Individual Motivations Conclusions Postface

Chapter Four 81

Literature Review 2: Entrepreneurial Motivation in Challenged Environments

Preface Subset 1: Entrepreneurship and Poverty Alleviation Models

a. Community-Based Enterprise b. Public Entrepreneurship c. Opportunity type d. Social Network Approach e. Embedded Entrepreneurship f. Three Social Entrepreneurship Models g. Social-Founder Identity

vi

h. Micros-enterprise Development Outcomes

Subset 2. Indigenous Entrepreneurship Approaches (Outside of Canada) a. Indigenous Australian Entrepreneurs Examining Success b. Social Capital and Networking c. Indigenous Entrepreneurship, Culture & Micro-experience d. Social Capital, Networking and Indigenous Entrepreneurs e. Australian Indigenous Entrepreneurs: Motivations and Commitment

Outcomes Conclusions Findings

Collateral Information: Filling the Previous Knowledge Gap Postface Thesis Progress Research Questions and Next Steps

SECTION III: RESEARCH

Chapter Five 108

Research 1: New Venture Creation, Motivation, and First Nation Entrepreneurs

Preface

Research Development and Design a. Foundation, Theoretical Propositions, and Research Variables b. Research Methodology

Data Analysis a. Primary Motivators b. Ranking of Motivators c. Motivation and New Venture Creation d. First Nation Business Models e. First Nation Perception of Mainstream Entrepreneur Motivations

Discussion a. Primary Motivators b. Ranking of Motivators c. Motivation and New Venture Creation d. First Nation Business Models e. First Nation Perception of Mainstream Entrepreneur Motivations

Conclusions Postface

Limitations Future Research Next Steps

vii

Chapter Six 162

Research 2: Business Model Canvas and First Nation Entrepreneurs

Preface Research Methodology Data Analysis

a. Business Model Canvas: Element Changes b. Business Model Canvas: Pillar Changes c. Business Model Canvas: Themes

Discussion a. Business Model Canvas: Element and Pillar Changes b. Business Model Canvas: Themes c. A New Model for First Nation Entrepreneurs: Business Model Circle

Conclusions Postface

Limitations Future Research

SECTION IV: CONCLUSIONS

Chapter Seven 209

Thesis Conclusions Preface Research Inquiries Key Findings Postface

Limitations Future Research

References

Appendix

Map of Canada with First Nations Indian Act

Qualitative Instrument: Chapter 5 Focus Groups Quantitative Survey Instrument: Chapter 5 Interview Records (A – L): Chapter 6

viii

LIST OF TABLES

Table 1. Average Income Score, First Nations & Non-Aboriginal Communities, 1981-2011 56

Table 2. CWB Component Scores, First Nations and Non-Aboriginal Communities, 2011 57

Table 3. Condition of Environmental Characteristics of First Nation Entrepreneurship 62

Table 4. Westbank First Nation Environmental Characteristics and Conditions 63

Table 5. Aspects Important to On-Reserve First Nation Entrepreneurship 71 Table 6. Aspects by Category of Importance to On-Reserve First Nation

Entrepreneurship 73

Table 7. Community Poverty Alleviation Model and Entrepreneurship Goals/Processes 91

Table 8. Motivations of Indigenous Entrepreneurs 99 Table 9. Independent and Dependent Variables 112

Table 10. First Nation Entrepreneur Motivator Importance by Business Stage 128

Table 11. Hypotheses: Change in motivation (static/increase/decrease) 146

Table 12. Business Model Changes per BMC Element and Business Stage 182

Table 13. Quotations: Entrepreneurs Key Resource Primary Contributor (Knowledge) 184

Table 14. Quotations: Entrepreneurs Busy with Growth Combined Postlaunch 186

Table 15. Quotations: Entrepreneurs with Businesses Closed 189

Table 16. Quotations: Entrepreneurs with Businesses Open 190

Table 17. Quotations: Entrepreneurs Prelaunch “help my community” 193 Table 18. Quotations: Entrepreneurs Postlaunch < 2 Years “help my community” 194 Table 19. Quotations: Entrepreneurs Postlaunch > 2 Years “help my community” 195 Table 20. Quotations: Entrepreneurs Bringing Knowledge Prelaunch 198

Table 21. Quotations: Entrepreneurs Increasing Knowledge Postlaunch < 2 Years 199

Table 22. Quotations: Entrepreneurs Using Knowledge Postlaunch > 2 Years 199

ix

LIST OF FIGURES

Figure 1 Importance value comparison: Combined scores of goal-setting motivations of Indigenous community entrepreneurial initiatives 94

Figure 2 Importance value comparison: Combined scores of goal-setting motivations of Indigenous community entrepreneurial initiatives 102

Figure 3 New venture creation motivators: interviews 121

Figure 4 Questionnaire percentages of primary motivators versus other Motivators 121

Figure 5 Questionnaire totals per motivator 122

Figure 6 Interview percentages of primary motivators versus other motivators 123 Figure 7 Questionnaire ranking of First Nation entrepreneur motivations 125

Figure 8 Interview rankings of First Nation entrepreneur motivations 125

Figure 9 Motivators of First Nation entrepreneurs by business stage 127

Figure 10 Importance-value of social good through business stages 129

Figure 11 Importance-value of financial gain through business stages 129

Figure 12 Importance-value of cultural support through business stages 130

Figure 13 Importance-value of Nation Building through business stages 130

Figure 14 Importance-value of joining business collective through business stages 131

Figure 15 Importance-value of social networking through business stages 131

Figure 16 Start-up business types of First Nation on-reserve entrepreneurs 133

Figure 17 Business model intent of First Nation entrepreneurs who know of sole proprietorship 134

Figure 18 Business model intent of First Nation entrepreneurs who know of business collective 135

Figure 19 Business model intent of First Nation entrepreneurs who know of social entrepreneurship 136

Figure 20 Intent to open social entrepreneurship 136

Figure 21 Intent to open sole proprietorship 137

Figure 22 Intent to open in business collective 137

Figure 23 Ranking of mainstream business motivators by First Nation Entrepreneurs 139

Figure 24 Comparison of primary motivators: First Nation and mainstream Entrepreneurs 139

Figure 25 Social gain: actual versus hypothesized importance-value changes

x

through business stages 147

Figure 26 Financial gain: actual versus hypothesized importance-value changes through business stages 147

Figure 27 Nation Building: actual versus hypothesized importance-value changes through business stages 148

Figure 28 Cultural support: actual versus hypothesized importance-value changes through business stages 149

Figure 29 Social networking: actual versus hypothesized importance-value changes through business stages 149

Figure 30 Joining business collective: actual versus hypothesized importance-value changes through new venture creation stages 151

Figure 31 Social good – financial gain: comparative importance-value changes through business stages 151

Figure 32 Nation Building – cultural support: comparative importance-value changes through business stages 152

Figure 33 Social networking – joining business collective: comparative importance-value changes through business stages 153

Figure 34 Total BMC changes per First Nation entrepreneur 168

Figure 35 Total BMC changes per Postlaunch stage by First Nation entrepreneurs 168

Figure 36 Mean BMC changes in each business stage by First Nation entrepreneurs 169

Figure 37 BMC element changes Postlaunch < 2 Years + > 2 Years by First Nation entrepreneurs 170

Figure 38 BMC element changes Postlaunch < 2 Years of First Nation entrepreneurs 170

Figure 39 BMC element changes Postlaunch > 2 Years of First Nation entrepreneurs 171

Figure 40 Comparison of BMC element changes per Postlaunch stage (bar graph) 171 Figure 41 Comparison of BMC element changes per Postlaunch stage (line graph) 172 Figure 42 Closed vs open businesses: combined mean postlaunch stages BMC

element changes 173

Figure 43 Closed vs open businesses: separated postlaunch stages mean BMC element changes 173

Figure 44 Sector experience: Business closures > 4 years First Nation entrepreneurs 174

Figure 45 Percentages of First Nation entrepreneurs with backgrounds in their new venture sectors 175

Figure 46 Combined postlaunch BMC changes per pillar (totals) 176

Figure 47 BMC total changes per pillar Postlaunch stages combined 176

Figure 48 BMC element changes per pillar: Postlaunch < 2 Years versus

xi

> 2 Years 177

Figure 49 Open First Nation businesses: Changes per pillar Postlaunch < 2 Years 177

Figure 50 Open First Nation businesses: Changes per pillar Postlaunch > 2 Years 178

Figure 51 Total references per BMC theme 179

Figure 52 Number of BMC references during Prelaunch stage 179

Figure 53 Number of BMC references during Postlaunch < 2 Years stage 181

Figure 54 Number of BMC references during Postlaunch > 2 Years stage 182 Figure 55 “Help my community” theme: References per business stage 182 Figure 56 “Financial concerns/action” theme: References per business stage 183 Figure 57 Mean entrepreneur BMC pillar changes per element 188

Figure 58 “Help my community” theme: References and comments per business Stage 196

xii

LIST OF DIAGRAMS

Diagram 1. Thesis Flowchart 10

Diagram 2. Framework for Describing New Venture Creation 19

Diagram 3. Variables in New Venture Creation 20

Diagram 4. Native Nations Model of Action 21

Diagram 5. Organization Emergence and Creation Process 23

Diagram 6. Cycles of Entrepreneurial Activity 23

Diagram 7. Goal-setting Theory of Motivation 24

Diagram 8. Mean Tendency Framework for Methodological Fit 113

Diagram 9. Indigenous Research Paradigm 117

Diagram 10. Business Model Canvas (BMC) 163

Diagram 11. Business Model Circle (BMCI) 205

xiii

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS

BMC Business Model Canvas

BMCI Business Model Circle

CBE Community-Based Enterprise

CCAB Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business

CWB Community Well-Being Index

EIFN Essipit Innu First Nation

EMES Emergence of Social Enterprises in Europe

FN First Nation

HDI Human Development Index

IBA Impact Benefit Agreement

MBA Master of Business Administration

MFN Membertou First Nation

MLTC Meadow Lake Tribal Council

NGO Non-government Organization

PREPPY Professional Readiness Employee Preparation Program for Youth

RCAP Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples

SWOT Strength, Weakness, Opportunity and Threat Analysis

TN Tahltan Nation

WFN Westbank First Nation

xiv

ABSTRACT

Poverty and economic disadvantage issues are prevalent in First Nation communities. Indigenous

entrepreneurship is an underdeveloped but potential resource to expand and enhance economic

development, self-reliance and quality of life for First Nation citizens. This thesis aims to fill

gaps of knowledge that exist in the field of Indigenous entrepreneurial goals, drivers and

motivations, and thereby contribute beneficially towards citizen member needs, community

prosperity, and Nation building aspirations of Indigenous peoples.

The thesis contains two separate literature reviews. Literature Review 1 establishes that while an

especially difficult business environment exists in First Nation communities, there is a paucity of

research regarding First Nation entrepreneurship. Literature Review 2 provides collateral

information from two different entrepreneurial population segments that identify potential

motivators for First Nation entrepreneurship research.

The thesis consists of two research undertakings, both using terms and conceptual frameworks

found suitable for First Nation entrepreneurial research. Utilizing a mixed sequential research

methodology with seventy-six FN entrepreneurs Research 1 determines the primary motivators

of FN entrepreneurs and their importance rankings, as well as how the motivators change

through business phases. Research 2, in response to a recommendation from Research 1,

examines further aspects of FN entrepreneurship through a qualitative research approach framed

by Business Model Canvas with twelve FN entrepreneurs. Rationales for changes in goal-setting

motivations and business decisions in new venture creation are determined, and a new, adaptive

model, Business Model Circle (BMCI), is developed for potential use by First Nation

entrepreneurs and researchers. The thesis ends with statements on the research limitations and

future research recommendations.

1

SECTION I: INTRODUCTION, DEFINITIONS & CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORKS

CHAPTER ONE

Introduction

Preface. Economic disadvantages and issues of poverty exist in many First Nation

communities. To help overcome these oft cited realities (Indigenous and Northern Affairs

Canada, 2011, 2012, 2015; Joseph, 2019; Miller, 2012; Champagne, 2015; Thrush, 2017;

Cornell, 2007) First Nation (FN) small business entrepreneurship is one opportune, but still

underdeveloped, resource towards economic development, poverty alleviation and quality of

life improvement by First Nation citizens. More recently, despite what had previously been

identified as a woeful shortage of these businesses (Cornell, Jorgensen, Record & Timeche,

2007), First Nation entrepreneurship is now surging (Curran, 2018), and has even begun to

outpace non-Indigenous mainstream Canada entrepreneurial growth (Callihoo & Bruno,

2016). More and more Indigenous peoples are pursuing entrepreneurial opportunities and

ventures (Clarkson, 2017). With the increasing numbers and successes of First Nation

entrepreneurs planning businesses, creating and developing new ventures, and expanding

their enterprises, the time is propitious to learn more about their business methods,

motivations, processes, environments, and strategies. Research may provide new

information, understanding and models contributing to future First Nation small business

development (and other Indigenous peoples and minorities) in their quest to strengthen

communities and overcome existing economic disadvantages. The overarching purpose of

this dissertation is adding new knowledge towards these purposes.

But who are First Nations people, and where should entrepreneurship research start?

2

Who are First Nations people? First Nations people are the predominant Aboriginal people of

the three Aboriginal groups in Canada (First Nation, Inuit, and Metis). Aboriginals are one of the

fastest growing demographic groups in Canada, having risen from 740,500 in 2010 to 911,700 in

2016. They are also a young population: Aboriginal children 14 years of age and lower make up

28.0% of the total Aboriginal population whereas this age group is only 7.0% of all children for

the rest of Canada. (Statistics Canada Data Census, 2016). Aboriginal people own, as well as

control, 20% of the Canada land mass, and that percentage is expected to increase to 30% by

2031 (Cooper, 2016).

Throughout the world there are many Aboriginal or Indigenous people (the terms Aboriginal

and Indigenous are used interchangeably), of which First Nations in Canada are one people.

An example of another North American Indigenous group, native Americans, refers to the

Indigenous people of the United States. Examples from outside North American include the

Māori, Indigenous people of New Zealand, and the Australian Aborigine, Indigenous people

of Australia. There are also typically numerous subcategories of Indigenous people within

each of the larger worldwide groups.

Across Canada, there are 634 First Nations bands or governments (see Appendix: Map of

Canada with First Nations), with a membership population of 977,235 citizens out of

Canada’s total population of 34,060,465, representing 2.9 % of the country’s overall

population (Statistics Canada Data Census, 2016). In 2011 45.3% of the First Nation

population lived “on-reserve”, and the remaining 54.7% lived “off-reserve” (Statistics

Canada, 2011); The 2016 Canadian census did not provide a comparative statistic for this

variable as it was significantly affected by incomplete enumerations of certain settlements

and reserves (Statistics Canada Data Census, 2016), but estimates remain at 46% living on-

3

reserve and 54% off-reserve A “reserve” is the term used for each of the more than 3,100

tracts of land identified under the Indian Act and treaty agreements for the exclusive use of a

First Nation band or government. First Nation entrepreneurs are those citizen members who

establish and operate their independently owned businesses, usually small or micro-

enterprises, typically on First Nation reserves and/or territories1. First Nation businesses that

are located off reserve land are sometimes referred to as “off-reserve businesses and

enterprises”. The primary focus of this thesis is First Nation communities and First Nation

entrepreneurs who self-identify as having businesses “on-reserve” or “on-territory”. These

small business operations are also distinct from First Nation band-owned enterprises,

businesses and economic initiatives that are often, but not necessarily, of a larger scale. The

terms “citizen entrepreneurs”, “on-reserve entrepreneurs”, and “First Nation small business

entrepreneurs” are regarded as synonymous with First Nation members who independently

own and operate private business enterprises.

Where should entrepreneurship research start? Entrepreneurship and new venture

creation are very broad subjects: how do we define and conceptualize these topics for the

purpose of our research? There are many related terms and aspects: economic development,

small and medium businesses, opportunity, embeddedness, partnerships, client segments,

crowdsourcing, startup costs, nascent and experienced entrepreneurs, social

entrepreneurship, risk management, cost structures, key resources and activities, revenue

streams, profit margins, and much, much more. And furthermore, what do we already know

about First Nation entrepreneurship? What specifically are any challenges and advantages

1 “Territory in this dissertation refers to both Treaty territory (land defined by negotiations and usually designated cartographically), and Traditional territory (land used and occupied by First Nations but not defined by Treaty).

4

facing these entrepreneurs? What constitutes success in new venture creation? What are the

most likely causes of their business failures and business successes? What motivates and

drives these entrepreneurs to be successful in overcoming challenges? What can we learn

that adds to existing knowledge of First Nation entrepreneurship: business planning,

processes, decisions, and development? How are business plans developed, followed and

pivoted from? The possible questions around entrepreneurship, and First Nation

entrepreneurs, are many and numerous.

Given the increasing development, and subsequent interest in First Nation business

development including specifically entrepreneurship, this focus of this dissertation is on

determining what knowledge presently exists on First Nation entrepreneurs, what drives and

motivates them, and what models and frameworks are conducive to the research and

development of First Nation new venture creation.

Primary Dissertation Inquiry. This dissertation is impelled by four key questions:

1. In this research, what do we mean by entrepreneurship, entrepreneurs, new venture

creation and motivation?

2. What knowledge exists regarding First Nation entrepreneurship: the entrepreneurs

and their organizations, processes, environments and motivations? (Chapter Three)

3. Specifically, what are the goal-setting motivators driving First Nation entrepreneurs

in new venture creation, and how do these drivers change through business stages?

(Chapter Four and Five)

4. What can we learn about, and add to the knowledge of, First Nation

entrepreneurship through Business Model Canvas? (Chapter Six)

5

Dissertation Roadmap. To answer these questions, the roadmap and journey followed

through the four sections of this study and dissertation on First Nation entrepreneurship will

be:

(a) framed by the definitions and conceptual schemas of Chapter Two;

(b) impacted in Chapter Three by limitations of information and research on First Nation

entrepreneurs’ new venture creation motivations and goals. This leads to a deeper

and wider scan for analogous, transferable information achieved in the following

chapter;

(c) extended into collateral literature reviews in Chapter Four: i. International poverty

alleviation models ii. Indigenous community entrepreneurship approaches, which

determine goals and motivators applicable to First Nation entrepreneurs for research

in Chapter Five;

(d) researched via a mixed method sequential design in Chapter Five to determine First

Nation entrepreneurs’: (a) primary motivators and their rankings; (b) changes in

motivators occurring through three new venture creation business stages (Prelaunch;

Postlaunch < 2 Years; Postlaunch > 2 Years);

(e) i. investigated further in Chapter Six research by utilizing the Business Model

Canvas framework in a qualitative study towards deeper understandings of First

Nation entrepreneurs’ processes, change decisions and dynamics during new venture

creation business stages;

ii. enhanced in Chapter Six with the emergence of an adapted business development

model more aligned with First Nation entrepreneurial goals, motivations and values.

6

(f) concluded in Chapter Seven with the presentation of key findings, dissertation

conclusions, recommendations, and limitations.

Chapter Overviews. This chapter is devoted to introducing the topic areas, and the

population group. It briefly summarizes the upcoming chapters and adumbrates the

dissertation path which commences with Chapter Two.

Chapter Two explores and provides definitions and conceptual frameworks used throughout

the dissertation for four terms that will be utilized in this study: “entrepreneurship”,

“entrepreneurs”, “new venture creation”, and “motivation”. Numerous definitions for these

aspects exist, and to establish consistency in research it becomes important for

entrepreneurial based studies to express as clearly and specifically as possible the ascriptions

and usages of key terms in studies (Gartner,1988; 1990; 2016). Motivation is seen as

especially important given that entrepreneurship theory development requires consideration

regarding entrepreneurs’ motivations and drivers as they make organizational decisions

about their processes and strategies (Shane, Locke and Collins, 2012). Finally, since

entrepreneurship does not remain static, but is active and dynamic, Chapter Two also

presents conceptual frameworks relevant for discussing and understanding entrepreneurial

processes (motivations and actions) across time and through business stages; It also

establishes the structure for the literature review of Chapter Three.

Chapter Three undertakes a preliminary literature review by examining First Nation

entrepreneurship within the definitions and frameworks set out in Chapter Two. The

literature review is delineated into key entrepreneurial elements of “organization”,

“process”, “environment and context”, and “individual motivations” in accordance with

W.B. Gartner’s “Four Variable Framework for Describing new Venture Creation” (Gartner,

7

1985, 2016; Gartner, Mitchell, & Vesper, 1989; Katz & Gartner, 1988). A scarcity of

information on First Nation citizen entrepreneurs is found, especially vis-à-vis organization

and process. While overall, a large portion of the literature review information found is

deficit based, focusing on the significant challenges of poverty, infrastructure and lack of

capital as environment contexts experienced by First Nation businesses in their

communities, five examples of First Nation communities with entrepreneurship activities are

presented. It is also determined that there is a dearth of research available on the motivations

driving First Nation entrepreneurial new venture creation. Having identified gaps through

the preliminary literature review, Chapter Three recommends additional literature reviews in

HOW OUR WEBSITE WORKS

Our website has a team of professional writers who can help you write any of your homework. They will write your papers from scratch. We also have a team of editors just to make sure all papers are of 
HIGH QUALITY & PLAGIARISM FREE.

Step 1

To make an Order you only need to click ORDER NOW and we will direct you to our Order Page at WriteDen. Then fill Our Order Form with all your assignment instructions. Select your deadline and pay for your paper. You will get it few hours before your set deadline.
 Deadline range from 6 hours to 30 days.

Step 2

Once done with writing your paper we will upload it to your account on our website and also forward a copy to your email.

Step 3
Upon receiving your paper, review it and if any changes are needed contact us immediately. We offer unlimited revisions at no extra cost.

Is it Safe to use our services?
We never resell papers on this site. Meaning after your purchase you will get an original copy of your assignment and you have all the rights to use the paper.

Discounts

Our price ranges from $8-$14 per page. If you are short of Budget, contact our Live Support for a Discount Code. All new clients are eligible for 20% off in their first Order. Our payment method is safe and secure.

Please note we do not have prewritten answers. We need some time to prepare a perfect essay for you.