Chat with us, powered by LiveChat This Competency includes a Short-Answer Response Assessment. Write your response to each prompt below?in the space provided. Beneath the prompts is the Rubric, which will be used by the Com | WriteDen

This Competency includes a Short-Answer Response Assessment. Write your response to each prompt below?in the space provided. Beneath the prompts is the Rubric, which will be used by the Com

This Competency includes a Short-Answer Response Assessment. Write your response to each prompt below—in the space provided. Beneath the prompts is the Rubric, which will be used by the Competency Assessor to evaluate your responses. Carefully review the Rubric rows associated with each prompt to provide a complete response. 

When writing your response, begin typing where it reads “Enter Your Response Here.” Write as much as needed to satisfy the requirements of the prompt.

CECS EP003 Funding Sources

Short-Answer Response Assessment Submission Form

Contact Information

Please provide your contact information and date of submission below.

Your Name: First and Last

Your Email address: Your e-mail here

Date: Click here to enter a date

Instructions

This Competency includes a Short-Answer Response Assessment. Write your response to each prompt below—in the space provided. Beneath the prompts is the Rubric, which will be used by the Competency Assessor to evaluate your responses. Carefully review the Rubric rows associated with each prompt to provide a complete response.

When writing your response, begin typing where it reads “Enter Your Response Here.” Write as much as needed to satisfy the requirements of the prompt.

Note: Save this file as EP003_firstinitial_lastname, and upload it to this Assessment within the learning platform. For example, EP003_B_Smith.

Short Answer 1

Describe each of the following public funding sources and its intended purpose. Responses should be a least 1 paragraph in length for each funding source.

a. Head Start

b. Child care subsidies

c. Child care tax credits

d. Title 1

e. Early childhood special education (IDEA)

f. State-funded pre-kindergarten

Rubric

0

Not Present

1

Needs Improvement

2

Meets Expectations

3

Exceeds Expectations

Sub-Competency 1: Describe public funding sources to support early childhood programs and initiatives.

Learning Objective 1.1: Describe various public funding sources.

Description is missing.

Description of the public funding sources and their purposes are partial or incomplete.

Response includes a clear description of each public funding source and its intended purpose.

Demonstrates the same level of achievement as “2,” plus the following:

Response clearly describes an additional public funding source and its intended purpose.

Short Answer 2

Read the descriptions of the two early childhood learning centers below. Both Checkers and Smart Start will be seeking funding from one of several sources: Head Start, child care tax credits, Title I, or early childhood special education (IDEA). Determine which funding sources are most appropriate for each center and explain why. Your response should be 4–6 paragraphs in length.

Checkers Early Childhood Learning Center

Checkers Early Childhood Learning Center is a comprehensive program providing a full range of services to children ages 6 weeks to 5 years and their families. There are several locations throughout Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona. Checkers also provides a full range of educational, social, and health services to children and families who are low income. Services for adults and families are available through family medicine and mental health. Licensed professionals provide comprehensive evaluation, early intervention, and therapeutic services.

Smart Start Early Childhood Learning Center

Smart Start Early Childhood Learning Center provides a secure, nurturing, and stimulating preschool environment that helps children to understand themselves as individuals as well as members of a community. We believe that a good early-school experience can set the tone for a lifetime of learning. Through daily lessons, community involvement, and self-exploration, we strive to spark and encourage creativity and imagination in each child. Our preschool programs strive to establish comfortable environments for each child to reach new developmental milestones. Services for the community are provided at no out-of-pocket cost to families who meet income guidelines.

Your Response

Enter Your Response Here

Rubric

0

Not Present

1

Needs Improvement

2

Meets Expectations

3

Exceeds Expectations

Sub-Competency 1: Describe public funding sources to support early childhood programs and initiatives.

Learning Objective 1.3:

Explain how various public funding sources apply to early childhood learning centers.

Explanation is missing.

Explanation is incomplete or vague.

Response includes a clear explanation of how the public funding sources applies to the early childhood learning center in the scenario.

Demonstrates the same level of achievement as “2,” plus the following:

Response explains why the other funding sources are not appropriate.

Short Answer 3

In addition to public funding, both Checkers Early Learning Center and Smart Start Early Learning Center have decided to pursue funding from private sources. Research private funding sources that would be applicable for each of the centers. Choose one source for each center and explain why the center is a good candidate for receiving this funding. Explain the process for obtaining the private funding sources you identified. The response should be 6–8 paragraphs in length.

Your Response

Enter Your Response Here

Rubric

0

Not Present

1

Needs Improvement

2

Meets Expectations

3

Exceeds Expectations

Sub-Competency 2: Evaluate private funding sources and processes for obtaining funding to support early childhood programs and initiatives.

Learning Objective 2.1:

Describe private funding sources.

Description is missing.

Response describes a vague or inappropriate private funding source for the early childhood center.

Response includes an accurate and relevant description of the private funding source appropriate for the early childhood center.

Demonstrates the same level of achievement as “2,” plus the following:

Response explains the benefits and challenges of seeking private funding.

Learning Objective 2.2:

Explain processes for obtaining private funding sources for early childhood learning centers.

Explanation is missing.

Response includes a limited or incomplete explanation of how to obtain private funding for each source.

Response includes a clear explanation of how to obtain each private funding source for an early childhood learning center.

Demonstrates the same level of achievement as “2,” plus the following:

Response identifies stakeholders involved and/or resources to support centers in the process for obtaining private funding.

Short Answer 4

Read the following reports about Universal Pre-K and its funding implications. Answer the questions that follow. Your response should be 4–6 paragraphs in length.

Barnett, W. S., & Hustedt, J. T. (2011). Improving public financing for early learning programs (Policy Brief Issue 23). Retrieved from http://nieer.org/resources/policybriefs/24.pdf

Citizen’s Budget Commission. (2013). The challenge of making universal prekindergarten a reality in New York state. Retrieved from http://www.cbcny.org/sites/default/files/REPORT_UPK_10222013.pdf

a. Explain the challenges New York is experiencing in funding universal pre-kindergarten.

b. Describe at least three potential funding sources for Universal Pre-K described in the Citizens Budget Commission report.

c. How might policies like universal pre-kindergarten impact funding for early childhood centers and the children and families they serve?

Your Response

Enter Your Response Here

Rubric

0

Not Present

1

Needs Improvement

2

Meets Expectations

3

Exceeds Expectations

Sub-Competency 3: Analyze the impact of political, economic, and social policies and trends on programmatic funding streams for early childhood settings.

Learning Objective 3.1:

Explain fiscal challenges in meeting policy initiatives.

Explanation is missing.

Response provides a vague or partial explanation of the fiscal challenges in meeting policy initiatives.

Response provides an accurate explanation of the fiscal challenges in meeting policy initiatives.

Demonstrates the same level of achievement as “2,” plus the following:

Response explains how these challenges are relevant to other initiatives or settings.

Learning Objective 3.2: Describe funding sources to meet policy initiatives.

Description is missing.

Response provides a vague or partial description of funding sources to meet policy initiatives.

Response provides an accurate and thorough description of three funding sources to meet policy initiatives.

Demonstrates the same level of achievement as “2,” plus the following:

Response describes more than three funding sources.

Learning Objective 3.3: Explain how policies and initiatives impact funding for early childhood programs.

Explanation is missing.

Response provides an incomplete explanation of how policies and initiatives impact funding for early childhood programs and the children and families they serve.

Response provides a thorough explanation of how policies and initiatives impact funding for early childhood programs and the children and families they serve.

Demonstrates the same level of achievement as “2,” plus the following:

Response uses specific examples to support the explanation.

©2014 Walden University 2

,

FEDERAL AND STATE FUNDING FOR CHILD CARE AND EARLY LEARNING Early childhood professionals, such as child care providers, teachers, and consultants, receive federal and state funding to provide a variety of services to children in low-income working families. Federal and state funding for early childhood services are available through a complex maze of funding streams and government agencies. The following are some quick facts about early childhood services and the funding streams that support these services.

■ Most federal funds are granted to State agencies to provide statewide services. Some federal funding is provided directly to local public and private entities. 1

■ Federal and state funding for child care services is also provided directly to parents via tax credits. Some States have established business tax credits to support child care providers directly. There are also tax credits available for businesses that sponsor child care for their employees.

■ The Federal and the State Departments of Education fund public (schools) and private (schools and child care programs) entities to provide early learning services to children in low-income families. The U.S. Department of Education (ED) also provides grants to selected Race to the Top – Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) fund States to improve early learning and development programs for young children through comprehensive early learning education reform.

■ The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) provides grants to local public and private nonprofit and for-profit agencies through the Head Start and Early Head Start programs to provide early learning services to children in low-income families.

■ In addition to funding early learning programs through Head Start, HHS also funds child care services for low-income working families. An estimated 2.4 million children received child care services through federal funding streams in an average month in FY 2009 (Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, 2012).

■ Federal funds are also available through the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to provide nutritious meals and snacks to children in child care programs. Approximately 3.3 million children receive nutritious meals and snacks through the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) each year.

1 Some of the Federal funding streams listed in this document (TANF, CCDF, CCAMPIS) also fund child care for school-age children during out-of-school times. There are additional federal and state funding streams that help fund services for school-age children during out-of-school time (such as 21st Century). Additional information about out-of-school time funding sources is available at http://www.findyouthinfo.gov/.

Child Care State Systems Specialist Network, A Service of the Office of Child Care 1

Federal and State Funding for Child Care and Early Learning December 2014

■ The majority of the federal and state funding is used to provide direct services to children and families but some funds are used to improve the overall quality of the services provided by early care and education programs, including the funding of technical assistance and training.

The following table summarizes available data for the major federal and state early care and education funding streams in the United States.

Table 1. Federal and State Early Care and Education Funding Streams

Federal and State Funding Sources

Programs Amount of Funding Number of Children Served Comments

Child Care and Federal Funding ­ 1.5 million CCDF is administered by the Office of Child Care (OCC) within the Development $5.3 billion average monthly (FY Administration for Children and Families (ACF), HHS and provides grants Fund (CCDF) State Funding ­

$2.0 billion (FY 2014 allocation)

2012) to States, Territories, and Tribes to assist low-income families, families receiving temporary public assistance, and those transitioning from public assistance in obtaining child care so they can work or attend education and training programs. Grantees must serve children younger than 13 years, however, some grantees may also elect to serve children ages 13 to 19 who are physically or mentally incapacitated or under court supervision. http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ccb/ccdf/factsheet.htm

Preschool $250 million To be determined These grants will help States, local education agencies, and local Development (FY 2014 governments build the fundamental components of a high-quality Grant Program estimate) preschool system or expand proven early learning programs. To be

eligible for funding, prospective grantees must describe how they will expand access to children from low- to moderate-income families, ensure an adequate supply of high-quality preschool slots and qualified teachers, monitor for continuous improvement, partner with local education agencies and other providers, and sustain high-quality services after the grant period. http://www2.ed.gov/programs/preschooldevelopmentgrants/index.html

Child Care State Systems Specialist Network, A Service of the Office of Child Care 2

Federal and State Funding for Child Care and Early Learning December 2014

Federal and State Funding Sources

Programs Amount of Funding Number of Children Served Comments

Federal Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit (CDCTC) 2

$3.3 billion claimed by taxpayers

(tax year 2010)

$6.2 billion claimed by taxpayers

(tax year 2010)

The Federal CDCTC helps families meet their child and dependent care expenses. Families can use any type of child care (such as a center, family child care [FCC] home, or a neighbor or relative’s house). The care must have been provided for one or more qualifying persons (dependent child age 12 or younger when the care was provided). http://www.irs.gov/newsroom/article/0,,id=106189,00.html

Head Start/Early Head Start 3

Federal Funding ­ $8.6 billion (FY 2014

expenditure)

1,034,000 (2012-2013 school year)

The Office of Head Start, within HHS, provides grants to local public and private nonprofit and for-profit agencies to administer Head Start and Early Head Start programs. These programs provide child-focused services to children from birth to age 5, pregnant women and their families, and have the overall goal of increasing the school readiness of young children from low-income families. http://transition.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ohs

2 Additional tax credits are also available to businesses that support child care programs. 3 Some States also use state funds to fund Head Start programs (2010 – 2011 school year: State Funding = $144 million).

Child Care State Systems Specialist Network, A Service of the Office of Child Care 3

Federal and State Funding for Child Care and Early Learning December 2014

Federal and State Funding Sources

Programs Amount of Funding Number of Children Served Comments

IDEA: Early $438.5 million 338,932 The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 (IDEA) authorizes Intervention (FY 2014 (FY 2013) formula grants to States and discretionary grants to higher education Program for appropriation) institutions and nonprofit organizations to support demonstrations, Infants and research, parent training and information centers, technology and Toddlers personnel development, and technical assistance and dissemination with within the State. Part C of the IDEA (also known as the Early Disabilities Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities) provides (IDEA Part grants to States to serve infants and toddlers (ages birth through 2 C) years) who have developmental delays or have been diagnosed with a

physical or mental condition that may result in developmental delays. The Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, within ED, administers the IDEA grants, including Part C grants. http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/osers/index.html

IDEA: Preschool $353.2 4 million 730,558 The Preschool Grants for Children with Disabilities program is authorized Grants for (FY 2014 (FY 2011) under Section 619 of Part B of IDEA and is administered by the Office of Children appropriation) Special Education and Rehabilitative Services within ED. It was with established to provide grants to States to serve young children with Disabilities disabilities, ages 3 through 5 years. (IDEA Part http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/osers/osep/index.html B)

Child Care State Systems Specialist Network, A Service of the Office of Child Care 4

Federal and State Funding for Child Care and Early Learning December 2014

Federal and State Funding Sources

Programs Amount of Funding Number of Children Served Comments

Military Child Development Program

$532 million (FY 2007) (Updated

information is not available)

175,000 approx. (FY 2007) (Updated

information is not available

The U.S. Department of Defense spends more than $530 million annually to provide child care services to military personnel, making it the largest employer-sponsored child care program in the United States. These services are provided to military families through both child development centers and FCC homes. http://www.defense.gov/news/QRMCreport.pdf

Race to the Top – Early Learning Challenge (RTT- ELC)

$370 million (FY 2013 funding)

211,000 (based on pre-k

enrollment in 6 grantee states)

RTT-ELC are competitive grants offered to States to improve their early learning and development programs through comprehensive early learning education reform. Nine States (CA, DE, MA, MD, MN, NC, OH, RI, WA) won funding through Phase 1 in FY 2011, five states (CO, IL, NM, OR, WI) won funding through Phase 2 in FY 2012, and six states (GA, KY, MI, NJ, PA, VT) won funding through Phase 3 in FY 2013 of the RTT–ELC that would provide funds to certain States that applied for, but did not receive, funding under Phase 1. http://www2.ed.gov/programs/racetothetop­ earlylearningchallenge/index.html

Child Care State Systems Specialist Network, A Service of the Office of Child Care 5

Federal and State Funding for Child Care and Early Learning December 2014

Federal and State Funding Sources

Programs Amount of Funding Number of Children Served Comments

Social Services Block Grant (SSBG)

$238 million (direct child care

spending) (FY 2012

expenditure)

Information not available

SSBG is administered by the Office of Community Services within HHS and provides grants to States to fund a broad range of social services within the State. Each State has the flexibility to determine how funds are distributed among services, what services are provided, and who is eligible for services. Some of the SSBG fund is used to fund child care services directly and part of the SSBG funds are transferred to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) to provide child care services. http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ocs/ssbg/about/factsheets.htm

State Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit (CDCTC)

Not Available Not Available Twenty-eight States have created a tax credit similar to the Federal CDCTC. In 13 of these States, the tax credit is refundable. The eligibility criteria for the tax credit vary by State. http://www.nwlc.org/our­ issues/tax-%2526-budget

Child Care State Systems Specialist Network, A Service of the Office of Child Care 6

Federal and State Funding for Child Care and Early Learning December 2014

Federal and State Funding Sources

Programs Amount of Funding Number of Children Served Comments

State-Funded Prekindergarten 4

$5.39 billion (2012 – 2013 school year) expenditure)

1.34 million (2012-2013 school year)

An early learning program funded by state general revenue funds to increase access and improve quality; it invests public resources in state- funded preschool education. The funding often goes to local school districts for programming that emphasizes school readiness. http://nieer.org/yearbook

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)

$2.5 billion (transfer)

$1.36 billion (direct) (FY 2013

expenditure)

Information not available

TANF is administered by the Office of Family Assistance within HHS and provides grants to States, Territories, or Tribes to assist families with children so children can be cared for in their own homes; reduce welfare dependency by promoting work, job preparation, and marriage; reduce and prevent out-of-wedlock pregnancies; and to encourage the maintenance and formation of two-parent families. States, Territories, and Tribes may transfer TANF funds to CCDF or directly spend funds on child care. http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ofa/tanf/about.html

4 There is some duplication between state-funded prekindergarten and State CCDF funds since many States use prekindergarten funding as Match for the CCDF program.

Child Care State Systems Specialist Network, A Service of the Office of Child Care 7

Federal and State Funding for Child Care and Early Learning December 2014

Federal and State Funding Sources

Programs Amount of Funding Number of Children Served Comments

Title I Preschool $14.4 billion (FY 2014)

appropriation

Not available Many school districts support preschool programs with their Title I (Education for the Disadvantaged) funds. More than 50,000 public schools across the country use Title I funds to provide addi

HOW OUR WEBSITE WORKS

Our website has a team of professional writers who can help you write any of your homework. They will write your papers from scratch. We also have a team of editors just to make sure all papers are of 
HIGH QUALITY & PLAGIARISM FREE.

Step 1

To make an Order you only need to click ORDER NOW and we will direct you to our Order Page at WriteDen. Then fill Our Order Form with all your assignment instructions. Select your deadline and pay for your paper. You will get it few hours before your set deadline.
 Deadline range from 6 hours to 30 days.

Step 2

Once done with writing your paper we will upload it to your account on our website and also forward a copy to your email.

Step 3
Upon receiving your paper, review it and if any changes are needed contact us immediately. We offer unlimited revisions at no extra cost.

Is it Safe to use our services?
We never resell papers on this site. Meaning after your purchase you will get an original copy of your assignment and you have all the rights to use the paper.

Discounts

Our price ranges from $8-$14 per page. If you are short of Budget, contact our Live Support for a Discount Code. All new clients are eligible for 20% off in their first Order. Our payment method is safe and secure.

Please note we do not have prewritten answers. We need some time to prepare a perfect essay for you.